[display_podcast]

This I believe that miracles do happen. A coincidence of fate can change a person’s life. It stays with them forever.

I am a miracle. My existence and my current being were never supposed to be as it is.

When my mom was six months pregnant with me, she was hospitalized for complications because of the pregnancy. During that time she had to endure many procedures. She was positioned upside down in her bed to prevent my premature birth and was required to take medicine. Even though doctors persisted, she did not take the medicine in fear in would hurt me.

Then the news came. The doctors told my mom that I only had a 20% chance of surviving and an 80% chance of dying. Then if I were to live, I had an 80% chance of being severely handicapped and a 20% chance of being lightly handicapped. With these odds, the doctors advised my mom to terminate the pregnancy. Doctors, who endured years and years of medical school and had amazing knowledge on this subject, advised my mother to give up, to give me up, to give my unborn life up.

So what should she do? Should she listen to professionals or herself? She couldn’t give up and decided to continue on, regardless of what would happen. She loved me with no limits and prayed everyday with my dad and their friends.

On July 6th, 1996, Carolina Jean Bae was born, a healthy, baby girl. She had no handicaps and was crying like any other newborn. It was a miracle. The baby that the doctors advised my mom to give up was alive and protected in my mother’s arms. I defied the odds.

But who was to pay for three months of hospitalization? A poor Korean couple with a two-year-old son and a newborn daughter? The immigrants with no family in America who were already paying for school fees and rent for a one-bedroom apartment? A six-digit bill was awaiting my parents.

Then the day they went to the hospital, it was gone. The social worker said it was probably a computer malfunction. The unbelievable amount of money was gone, nothing for them to pay, and to this day they still don’t know what happened. My mom still thinks it was a computer malfunction, but my dad and I think someone out there paid it for us, another miracle.

Amazing feats happen when you least expect them to. I’d like to call them miracles. But it is not just events like these that qualify for miracles. Living another day is a miracle, just as getting an A on that paper you thought you bombed, or just waking up in the morning. This I believe, miracles do happen.